Tuesday, December 12, 2017

The Holistic Review Process-Beyond the Numbers




It is December, which means our holistic file reading process will begin soon. Instead of giving you a nice "slice of life" story which then transitions into our reason for reading files, I will just go straight into the process (except for the Rudy clip). For a large group of our applicants (ones who are not admitted based on their academics alone in November and February), we spend almost three months diving into everything in a student's application to better understand them, look at them in comparison with the rest of the applicant pool, and ultimately make final decisions about our freshman class. I have had a number of comments on the blog asking what we look at in this process, so here are the areas we look at in our holistic review. I could probably write six pages worth of explanation about the process, but I have summarized each area to lessen the pain of exhaustion for the reader. There is more to our review process than just these brief descriptions though, but at least this gives you some details of the process.

  1. Activities/Involvement/Leadership The first thing you should know about activities is that we value quality over quantity. What we are looking for is somewhat about the range of what a person does, but more so the depth of their involvement. It is not about how many clubs/sports/activities you can join, but instead looking at is what things you have committed to during your high school years, both in time and in consistency. In addition, another area we look at a student's dedication to family and work. At times, a student may have limited involvement in clubs, but that might be due to a dedication to their family and/or job. 
  2. Writing/Creativity/Expression - In the review of an applicant's writing, our focus is more the writer's voice, how well they communicate their ideas, and how well they "show" us their information, and less focus is put on grammar and structure. Yes, we still want a student to write clearly and spell check their work, but that is not the key. The other area within this part looks at a student's creative side. While we see some of these items within the activities section, we want to see how a student shows their creativity. We look at their involvement in the arts, but also in the "non-artistic" side of things such as robotics, design, newspaper, etc. We try to get an understanding of their aesthetic side of life. We will focus more on the writing part during this review, but a student's passion for creativity does come into play.
  3. Academic Review - When we look at a student's transcript during the holistic review process, we are trying to understand how a student has progressed over their 3+ years in high school. Have they been consistently strong throughout the years, did they start slow and then jump up to all A's, did they have a tough time in a specific subject, are all their B's low or high B's, etc. We are looking at core grades, we are focused on the actual grades, not a GPA on a transcript, and we are looking at trends and how you have done in your most challenging classes.
  4. Strength of Curriculum/Intellectual Challenges - First,there is no magic number of AP/IB/Honors/Advanced/Dual Enrollment/Post-AP classes needed for admission, because there is no right answer. Instead, we look at the academic opportunities both at your school and in your community for the answer. What I mean is, most competitive colleges are going to look at what academic options are available to you as a student, and what you have then chosen to take. What have you done within the context of what is available? We also look at summer programs (Governor's Honors programs, Girls State, etc), activities which focus on developing your academic side, and how you are preparing yourself for the academic challenges at UGA.
  5. Integrity/Work Ethic/Maturity - One area of admissions that is not always talked about, but which has a great impact over the entire file, is the idea of work ethic and maturity. I often refer people to a scene from the movie Rudy, where the main character never lets up, even on the last play of the last day of practice. UGA recognizes the overachiever, the one that has taken what they have been given and gone beyond everyone's expectations.
  6. Respect for Others - In looking at applicants, we are looking at future members of the UGA community.  They will be living in the residence halls together, studying together, dating, hanging out, and generally interacting with the people in the UGA community 24/7. In light of this, I want to know how they interact with other people in their own community right now. Which students step outside their comfort zone to grow and understand others? Who reaches out to people in their community in need, using their time and effort to give back to other people? What students actively learn about other cultures and other people, and share a bit of themselves as well?
It takes a while for our team to review the large number of applications, and to dig into everything within the file. These files are given multiple "reads", and we are looking at everything in the application, including activities/sports/summer events/employment sections, transcripts, test scores, recommendations, resumes, essays, etc. We expect final decisions to go out sometime in mid-late March, but that is based on moderate growth projections of how many total applications we will receive this year, so that could change.

Go Dawgs!

Friday, December 8, 2017

ACT Site Closings and Test Scores

As sometimes happens in Georgia, we are hit by a snowstorm, which means people flock to the grocery store for break and milk, schools are cancelled for a period of time, and testing centers for the SAT and ACT have to postpone the exams. UGA Admissions has been tracking the school closings for December 8, 2017, and we also know that some ACT sites for the 12/9 ACT exam will be postponing this testing date.

In light of this, we have heard that the most likely make-up exam date will be the weekend of January 6-7, 2018. If a student has an ACT exam that is postponed from 12/9 to 1/6 or 1/7, we will use the ACT from this make-up ACT exam. Two provisions do apply to this extension of the deadline:

  1. If you are taking the ACT make-up exam, make sure that UGA is a score recipient prior to you taking the test. Do not wait until after you see the scores to determine if you should send the results, as this will delay things. Since UGA is a "best score" institution and we superscore test scores, sending us the scores before knowing the results will not hurt an applicant in any way.
  2. If there are unusual situations surrounding your scores for the 1/6 date which causes the scores to extremely delayed in being sent (late February or March as an example), this will cause us problems in accepting these scores for 2018 applicants. We do not expect any unusual situations, but that is why the oddities are referred to as unusual. At a certain point, UGA has to stop importing scores and documents so we can move forward with decisions.
For anyone sending in test scores, know that we upload scores the morning after we receive them from the testing agency, and you can track the scores both on your application status page and on the student portal of the testing agency. If a score shows up on an applicants status page prior to final decisions, it means we imported it in time and are able to use it.

I hope this helps! Now run out and buy eggs, milk, bread and water. It's going fast.

Go Dawgs!

Friday, November 17, 2017

2018 Early Action Decisions are Available

Early Action decisions are now available online! For students who were deferred, please understand that this is not a denial decision.  We want to be able to have a more in-depth review of you, including short essays, activities, recommendations, etc.  Please be sure to read the deferred student FAQ page before commenting on here.

The 2018 Early Action Decision press release gives more details on the class, but here are a few numbers from it.

Quick Early Action Numbers*

Applications Received: 14,989
Offers of Admission: 8,060
Mid 50% Admitted Average GPA: 4.00-4.27
Mid 50% Admitted Average SAT (EBRW+M): 1320-1470
Mid 50% Admitted Average ACT: 30-32
Mid 50% Admitted AP/IB/MOWR courses (over 4 years: 7-11) 
    -Academic Rigor is based on an overall core course review, but this gives a good glance at the challenge of our admitted student's curriculum.

* Please Remember that these numbers are mid-ranges, not minimums.

If you have questions about your specific decision, please do not post them on this blog.  As well, do not give out or request personal academic information in your post, as we would then need to delete these posts. We are not able to answer questions about individual students here because we will generally not have your information in front of us and we cannot disclose individual student information in a comment.  I would recommend talking with both your family and high school counselor first, then reviewing this previous post on suggestions about how to react to an EA decision, and finally reading the FAQ's available from your Status page.

Please be patient, be nice and be courteous.


Have a great weekend and go Dawgs!

Thursday, November 9, 2017

2018 Early Action Decision Timeline

For all of you who are waiting anxiously by your computer/mailbox, nervous about your Early Action decision, here is some good news. UGA is planning on releasing the EA decisions on the Status page on Friday, November 17 in the late afternoon unless some serious problem arises, which I do not expect. If this changes, we will let you know, but this is the plan at this time. If there are issues, the release date and time would then be a little later, either over the weekend or the early part of the next week.  Do not call/email/text/message/tweet asking for the exact time of "late afternoon", as I cannot give an exact time. We will post a message here when it opens up. We are excited about this, and I am guessing you are as well, and hopefully it will allow for a little less nerve-wracking Thanksgiving break for some of you.

In addition to the decisions being available on the Status page, letters will go out in the mail for Accepted students. Freshman denial letters will not be mailed out, as almost all applicants see their decisions online, and we, along with a number of colleges, did not want to have a letter that only served to reinforce the negative feelings they might already have.

Here are a few suggestions on how to react to the four different decisions:

Admit: Celebrate with family, buy a lot of UGA gear to wear for the Thanksgiving break, but remember that not everyone has received a decision of admission, and so be a little more low key with friends and classmates. In other words, do not run up to you best friend during English class and scream "I got into Georgia" while 10-15 of your classmates are mentally creating new and painful ways for you to meet your doom. In addition, be patient with the other parts of campus (commitment deposit, housing, the UGA myID system, etc.), as they might need a few days to take in your information. Remember, it takes a little while for information to flow to other offices. Read the materials we give you online and in an acceptance packet as it will instruct you on what to do next.

Defer: This is the most challenging one, as these are applicants who are truly strong students, but we want to see more about them, as well as the rest of the applicant pool, before making a final decision.  Please remember, this is not a denial at all, but instead a way for us to be able to review you in full, from your co-curricular activities, your essays, and your recommendations. As I usually state, defer is not a four letter word (even though you might feel this way), only a delay in an admission decision. This is the time in which we are able to look at your overall application, as we have time to do holistic reads from December through mid-March. While this is probably not the answer you would like, I would suggest you treat it as a call-back for a second audition. Some roles have already been cast (or admitted), and we now want to look at you in more detail to see how you compare to the rest of the people auditioning (or applying). One of the worst things is to call us up and berate us for not admitting you. We will be happy to talk to people, but make sure to communicate in a positive tone, understand that we cannot talk about other applicants, and again please remember that defer does not mean denial.  One step you can take is to make sure we have received a recommendation from a teacher in an academic area (it is optional but we suggest having one sent in). A second step is to give us any updates through an update form you will see on your status page. This could be fall grades (when you know them), a new activity, job or leadership role, or anything you want to add to your file. Remember, UGA is in no way done with the overall freshman admission process. We still have a long way to go, with a great deal of files to read and admission offers to make, so just be patient.

Deny: While this is not a fun situation at all, the reality is that if you have been denied Early Action, you are truly not competitive for admission at UGA as compared to the rest of the applicant pool. It is not easy to write that, and it is very difficult to tell this to a student or parent, but when we look at this  student's application in comparison with the other 14,500+ EA applicants (and remember, we expect to get over 10,000 RD applicants as well), they do not match up academically with the others. It is better to tell you now instead of waiting until late March, as this gives you time to make other plans. Unless there seems to be a serious error (you are in the top of your class, take a very challenging course load, and have a strong test score), my suggestion is to not contact us about the decision, but instead move forward with plan B. While we do not mind talking with you at all, the reality is that an Early Action denial means that the admission to UGA is not possible as a freshman.

Incomplete: For the small number of students who did not complete your EA file, you are now automatically deferred to the next step, and so you will need to get in the missing materials from EA, (remember the teacher recommendation is optional but we suggest also having one sent in). We went three plus weeks beyond the deadline allowing you to get in the missing documents, sending reminder emails, indicating what was missing through the Status page, and it was your responsibility to get in the required materials. So I do not suggest contacting us to see if we can take items late, as that time has passed. Focus instead on sending in what is needed to be reviewed in the next round.

Go Dawgs!

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

2018 Early Action Update

With the Early Action deadline having just passed, here are a few updates about the process:

  • Total EA Applications:  14, 979 applications submitted
  • Complete Early Action Applications as of today: 10, 577 (72% of the group)
  • # of EA Applicants Applying within 2 days of Deadline: 5,802
As you can see, a large number of the Early Action applications are complete. The biggest item that is missing right now are official test scores, and as long as they were both taken and UGA was marked as a score recipient by 10/16, we can use them. They do not need to be in by 10/22, only requested by 10/16. You can see if your SAT scores have been sent by looking at the Score Sends option on your online score report. For ACT scores, you should be able to track things by looking under the Orders and Returns tab to see when the order number was processed. If you took the 10/7 SAT, we expect that those scores will be sent to us by late October. When we receive new scores, we add them to your file and automatically update your information.

We are caught up completely on importing documents, sent both electronically and by mail. If a document has been mailed to us, we are entering it into our system the day we receive it. If a document is not in by 10/22, we suggest you make sure it has been sent. One key item: A school report is not a school profile! It is a Secondary School report or Counselor letter that tells us more about you.

Your Steps

Be sure to check your Status Page to make sure you are complete!  If items you have sent are not showing up on your Status Page, double-check with your counselor, College Board, ACT, etc. to make sure that it was sent.  If a document was sent and it has been more than 10 business days, I would suggest either re-sending the document(s) or contacting us. We do not accept faxed documents, so make sure to send it electronically or by mail.

Now that you have submitted your application (and it is hopefully complete), take a few minutes to relax and enjoy the fall weather.

Go Dawgs!

Friday, September 22, 2017

Sharks, Test Scores and Fear

Sharks are terrifying. They are big, they have huge pointy teeth, and and they like to eat. But the chances of you dying from a shark attack are pretty small. I mean one in eight million or so small. So while sharks are big and scary, in reality, you shouldn't worry about them too much. In the same way, two words, three little letters each, cause an overwhelming amount of stress and angst. The SAT and ACT. They also seem big and scary, just without the pointy teeth. But in the same way that people overestimate the chances of a shark attack, they also overestimate the importance of the SAT and/or ACT tests.

While a wide range of colleges use the SAT and/or ACT in the admissions review, the importance of these tests is generally overblown, and a number of colleges are test optional. Almost all (if not all) colleges, including UGA, state in their admissions review information that what a student does in the classroom is much more important than what a student does on a standardized test. At UGA, we give a rough estimate of 75+% of the academic portion of our review is focused on core grades and curriculum, with a much smaller percentage being the test score information. During our holistic file review where we look at everything, the importance of test scores becomes even smaller. Yet even with this information, the panic over test scores still runs wild.

Here are some lifetime odds on the chances of different methods of dying:


  • Motor Vehicle accident -1 in 113
  • Falling - 1 in 133
  • Motorcycle accident - 1 in 949
  • Any Force of Nature - 1 in 3,122
  • Airplane/Spaceship - 1 in 9,738
  • Tornado - 1 in 60,000
  • Lightning - 1 in 174,443
  • Bee/Wasp Stings - 1 in 308,629
  • Shark Attack - 1 in 8,000,000
People get very worried about a shark attack, but less so about lightning, and falling down the stairs is rarely ever a concern. But the reality is that you should be really careful going down the stairs, and not as worried about death by sharks or bees. In the same vein, I suggest students focus much more on their grades in their core classes and the rigor of their curriculum, and less on standardized tests. I can never give exact percentages on how important each specific item is in our overall review (I get a huge number of questions about how important essays are for instance), but hopefully this helps a little in understanding this issue. 

By the way, death by a sharp objects accident is 1 in 30,863, so don't run with scissors.

Go Dawgs!

Monday, August 28, 2017

Parents-Inspire Adventure!

My son is a junior at Georgia Tech (yes, a UGA admissions person has a child at GT), where he is studying Aerospace Engineering with a Certificate in Astrophysics. My wife and I have trouble even comprehending his courses now, such as Jet and Rocket Propulsion, much less being able to help him with any coursework. On the plus side, we do get to say "Well yes, my son is a rocket scientist". We still like to give him our wonderful parental words of advice though, with one of the key ones being "Go to all of your classes".

It was challenging, therefore, when he told us in August that he would be missing the first day of class for the Fall 2017 term so he could travel with a group of friends to see solar eclipse in the "path of totality" in South Carolina. As parents, our first thought was to tell him no way. It's bad enough to miss class, much less miss the first day of class. But being good parents (at lease as good as we can be), we told him that it was his decision to make, and we would be okay with his choice. He let his professors know his plans, sent out texts and group invites planning out the trip, and then caravanned up to Clemson, SC with nine friends to experience the total eclipse.

Being parents, we tracked his progress up to SC on our iPhone, hoping that they would not get caught up in traffic and that the trip would go well. It was wonderful when he texted us after the eclipse saying "It was the most amazing thing ever!". This is high praise coming from a person where the majority of his responses to his parents are "Okay" and "Yup". We spent too much time worrying about him missing class and too little time thinking about the amazing adventure he would experience. As a future Aerospace Engineer, his passion is space, and how much more thrilling an event can you get than a total eclipse surrounded by friends. We focused too much on the "correct" thing to do and too little on the overall impact of the actual experience.

Sometimes parents of prospective college students focus so much on the process, they forget to look at the adventure. Yes, the college process is about admission, finding the right fit, and focusing on a degree/job. But it is also about the smaller, more meaningful events that occur within that span of four years. I personally don't believe that college will always be the proverbial "best years of your life", as students will encounter joys and challenges during there college time. But what I do believe is that some of the most amazing adventures in your life will occur during your college time. The biggest thing for students is to learn to look for these potential events, and for parents to foster this mindset.

So parents, help your kids with the day to day things, but don't forget to inspire them to seek out those amazing adventures that come along.

Go Dawgs!

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

The Coalition Application and Pizza

For those of you who don't know (or who have not read many of my blog posts), I am a great believer in analogies. I find that most times, the easiest way to explain the sometimes complicated world of admissions is to make it relatable to their own lives. As such, I am going to somehow tie together the new Coalition Application with Pizza. Yes, pizza, that wonderful meal/snack/superfood we all know and love.

Most all of us love pizza, both because of the great taste but also because we generally know what to expect no matter who makes it. Most every pizza is going to have a crust, a layer of sauce and cheese. This is the base of almost all pizzas, and you can be sure that everyone from Papa Johns to your local hometown pizza joint starts with this. In the same way, there are a set of standard questions that most all admissions applications use as a base. Everyone asks for your name, your birth date, your high school, etc. Generally, these questions make up about 75-80% of the questions on the Coalition application.

On the other hand, the thing that makes each pizza unique are the toppings. Everybody has their own favorites, with mine being pepperoni and bacon (don't judge, bacon is great on everything). Yours could be banana peppers, olives and pineapple for all I know, as everyone has their own unique taste. Similarly, each college has unique questions that they need, many times due to their institutional needs or state requirements. Public colleges need data on your state residency, while private schools have less of a need for this information. Some colleges will not ask for essays, others will use the Coalition essay questions, while some (like UGA) will have their own short essay questions. Different universities also have different majors, different admission decision plans, etc. Each college, just like each pizza-loving person, has different tastes. These are the questions which will be displayed on each institutions college-specific pages in the Coalition application.

UGA will continue to use both our own application and the Coalition application, and we have no preference on which you should use. The only issue we will have is if you submit both applications, which will cause problems (like Ghostbusters "don't cross the streams" problems). In other words, submit one or the other application, but not both! I suggest you look at the other colleges using the Coalition application to see if there is any overlap, and then make a decision from there. The Coalition application will allow you to enter a little less data, but if you have already been interacting with our office (you sent test scores, visited campus, etc.), a large amount of this data will pre-populate when using the UGA based application. As stated in a previous blog post, all freshman applicants must write 2 short essays, with one being mandatory and the second giving you the option of selecting one out of four topics (with one coming from the Coalition list of essay topics).

For either application, we will not open up the Fall 2018 option until September 1. We generally wait until early September to give both you and your school counselors time to get back into the swing of things before the transcript/recommendation requests start. As well, all applicants will use the UGA admission status page to check on receipt of test scores, admission materials and admission decisions. If you do submit the Coalition application, you will then receive an email which will direct you on how to set up your admission status page.Prior to Sept. 1, you can get ready to apply by looking at my earlier post of Are You Ready so that when the application opens up, you will be prepared to start the process. FYI: UGA will not be using the Coalition Locker or Collaboration Space, as we will just be using the application.

So go out, eat some pizza and start planning out your application. I hope this helps, and Go Dawgs!

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Are You Ready?


Summer is a time for vacations, part-time jobs, and relaxation. But for rising HS seniors, it is also time to prepare for the college application process. I am not suggesting you have everything ready to submit an application on opening day of the UGA application (September 1 by the way), but only that you have some things laid out in order to be on top of the process. In our research concerning last year's applicant pool, there was a dramatic dip in both admission rates and strength of essays for students who either waited until the last minute to apply or who spent only a few days working on the application. In saying this, here are a few suggestions on steps to take get ready to apply to UGA.
  1. Map out your college application plan. If you are like most students, you will apply to 3-5 colleges. If this is the case, you will have to track the deadlines, materials time lines and actions needed for all of these colleges. Get a calendar (electronic or paper) just for admissions time lines, and enter in the deadline dates, scholarship dates, campus programs, deposit dates, etc. for all these colleges. This is the best way to keep this process organized and to not miss out on something. The worst calls we handle are when a student did not do X by a certain deadline and we can't do anything for them except say sorry.
  2. Get prepared. Before you start your application, you will need to have the following items on hand; your correct Social Security Number (SSN), a copy of your transcript which shows grades from 9th through 11th grade, a copy of your resume, your SAT/ACT/AP scores and your counselor's contact information including email. As well, have your payment information on hand (either a credit card number or a digital copy of a fee waiver). It is key to have the correct SSN when you apply, as all financial aid offices use this as a matching field for all financial aid. I heavily suggest going ahead and sending us your SAT/ACT scores, as this will take care of this step, will pre-populate the test score section of the application, and will possibly allow us to communicate with you about certain events.
  3. Start working on your essays. Starting this year (students applying for Fall of 2018), both Early Action (EA) and Regular Decision (RD) applicants must submit 2 short essays, as compared to previous years when only RD and deferred EA applicants submitted them. Summer is the perfect time to start thinking about the UGA admission essays, and to begin the writing process. Make sure to proofread the essays, have someone review them for you, as you do not want to wait until the last minute to start on these.
  4. Don't listen to rumors/myths about college admissions. I have been over this many times, so I won't beat a dead horse. All I can say is that I have had three surgeries in my life, but going through the experience does not make me a doctor, just a good patient.
  5. Let your parents be involved in the admissions process, but only so much. It is okay to allow your parents to be a part of the college admissions process, but make sure that you are the one who completes the application, writes the essays, etc. Your parents can be great at helping you keep track of deadlines, make plans for visiting colleges, and giving you suggestions about your application. In the end, though, make sure you are the one driving/managing this process, as you are the one who will be at college next year.
I hope this helps, and Go Dawgs!

Monday, June 19, 2017

Out of the Office

I will be out of the office for the next two weeks, so I will not be able to reply to any comment until after I return. If you are not able to wait until then for an answer to your question, I suggest you reach out to our office directly.

Go Dawgs!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Spring 2018 Transfer Update

Today, our office started reviewing Spring 2018 transfer applications. This is earlier than I expected, but we are way ahead of the timelines we have predicted for Summer/Fall transfers updates and final HS transcript reviews for freshmen. The 8/15 application deadline for spring has not passed and we are still receiving applications and documents, so we cannot say how long it will take us to finish or guess when you will hear a decision.  If you applied for the spring term, please be sure to check your Status page to see if we have your most up-to-date transcript(s). If you were enrolled in coursework this summer and have not sent a transcript with your summer grades, you should have one sent as soon as possible.  To be complete and ready to review, we must have a transcript from each college/university you have previously attended.  If you are attending a new college starting in the Fall 2017 semester, we do not need a transcript, as there will not be any grades on the transcript. If you are admitted, we will need a transcript when fall term is done, though, as we will need to post these grades.

Just like Summer and Fall transfer decisions, we will release our decisions every Friday in the late afternoon, and emails will go out to students roughly 15 minutes after a decision is released indicating a change to a student's status (no decision information is in the email, as it directs applicants to the status page for a decision). As such, there is no need to constantly check your status page or contact us by email or phone, as we only release decisions by the status page and by mail.

Generally, our office reviews transfer files chronologically based on when the file is complete (all materials are in), but this is not set in stone, as some file reviews might be delayed due to the complexity of the transcripts or due to our office not having past data on transferable work from certain colleges.

We will be reviewing Spring Freshmen applicants sometime in mid-late September after the deadline has passed and all files are ready for review.


Go Dawgs!

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

The Back Door is Closed

Our Admissions Office receives a number of calls each day, with questions that range from the traditional ("When does your transfer application open up this year?") to the unconventional ("What are the tinted window laws in Athens, GA?"). Recently, one father called in to speak with one of our admissions counselors, and he asked "I am looking for a back door into UGA for my daughter. Can you help me?" Yes, that was the actual question. It was almost like he was envisioning an admissions-style Harry Potter Platform 9 and 3/4 train station wall where a few lucky people could enter while the rest remained oblivious to this secret passage.

While some people might see this situation as strange, parents and high school students are hearing from trusted sources such as their neighbors, second cousins and the friendly barista at the local coffee shop that there are back doors to get into X college. Rumors abound about applying for certain terms, playing a specific instrument, applying for a specific major, or overwhelming an admissions office with communications to let them know the college is #1 in the student's mind. On a recent episode of the TV show American Housewife, teenage son Oliver starts taking ballet in order to have a better chance of admission to Harvard. I even know of a family who considered moving their kids to a small town in south Georgia because they are certain it will make it easier to be admitted as compared to being from Atlanta. I am sure the individuals who share these theories are well meaning and think they are being helpful, but they are, unfortunately, misguided.

Every college has their own policies and procedures about admissions, and they vary based on the institution, their mission, and what they look for in their admission review. In addition, each admissions office has to deal with the rumors that swirl around their decisions and juxtaposes these with the reality of their actual admission process. Just the simple fact that so many colleges talk about admissions urban legends should alert you to the fact that we recognize these myths and actively try to share the reality that there are no shortcuts. Here are two examples at UGA of supposed back doors about admissions as compared to reality.
  1. Summer term is easier for admission back door: When a student applies to UGA and selects their term, we have a pop-up message for anyone who selects summer indicating that decisions are no different for summer vs fall students. If a student is admitted for summer, they can contact us and ask to be changed to fall (or vice versa) and we will be happy to do it. At times a university (not UGA) might offer summer as a "trial" term for students to prove themselves, but this is a purposeful decision by the college to move the student to that term, and not a back door that students would select and sneak in.
  2. Choose a lesser known major back door: When a student applies to UGA, we need to have them select an intended major so if they enroll, they can meet with an advisor, plan out their courses, etc. But we also know that many students change their major, and we allow for this, as we want a student to study in the field they desire. As such, a student's choice of major does not impact a decision. In fact, if a student is admitted to UGA and submits a deposit, they can access the UGA student system the next day and change their major. Some universities (not UGA) do have different review procedures for different majors, but most times a student would then be locked into that major/program, which is not always the best option for many students.
My suggestion? Focus on the "front door" by doing research on each college you are interested in, look at what each college lists as the important items for admission consideration, and then work on making these items your areas of strength. In addition, take the time you might spend searching for a back door and use it to try something new or different in your life. I am sorry to shatter any dreams, but there is no Platform 9 and 3/4 in admissions, and no owls will be delivering your acceptance letter (we've tried but they are too hard to train). 

Good luck, focus on the front door, and Go Dawgs!

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

2018 Freshman Essays

Every year, our office reviews the freshman application for changes that we would like to see for the next year. During this review, we also look at the short essay questions that are required for First Year applicants. Starting this year, we will have all freshman, Early Action (EA) and Regular Decision (RD) submit two essays in their application. This is a change, as for the last 10 years, EA applicants have only submitted essays if they were deferred. But to keep the same timelines (with projected application growth) and to balance adding the Coalition application, among other things, we have added the essays (down from three to two) to the EA application.  We require one short essay that all applicants must complete, and four additional short essay topics with the applicant selecting to respond to one of these. These two essays should be between 200-300 words and remember to focus on substance and not word count.  Before submitting your application and essays, always remember to proofread and edit!  The First Year application will be available on September 1, but we thought that some people would want to know the essay prompts earlier than that date.

Here are the five essay questions, with Essay 1 being required and Essays 2-5 being four options from which the applicant selects one.
  
  1. (RequiredThe college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself that you have not already shared in your application.
Choose one of the following four:
  1. UGA’s 2017 Commencement speaker Ernie Johnson (Class of ’79) told a story from his youth about what he refers to as blackberry moments. He has described these as “the sweet moments that are right there to be had but we’re just too focused on what we’re doing …, and we see things that are right there within our reach and we neglect them. Blackberry moments can be anything that makes somebody else’s day, that makes your day, that are just sweet moments that you always remember.” Tell us about one of your “blackberry moments” from the past five years.
  2.   Creativity is found in many forms including artistic avenues, intellectual pursuits, social interactions, innovative solutions, et cetera. Tell us how you express your creativity.
  3. Tell a story from your life, describing an experience that either demonstrates your character or helped to shape it.
  4. Describe a problem, possibly related to your area of study, which you would like to solve. Explain its importance to you and what actions you would take to solve this issue.
I have also included a sample essay from this past application cycle to give you an example of what we consider a strong essay, and it is one from the required 2018 freshman essay prompt.

"Oh no, what have I done?' explained my facial expression after an unbelievable event happened years ago. The scene took place in my backyard. One day my neighbors left the house and their two dogs, Peanut and Lucky to go to the store. They gave me permission to play with the dogs, but specifically told me to keep a close watch. I usually play with Lucky, the bigger one because he was more aware of his surrounding and did not bark as much, but this time I decided to take Peanut. While we were outside, a huge hawk came flying by but I didn't think much of it. I remember walking inside the house and returning to see the hawk flying away with Peanut in his claws. I didn't know what to do because I knew my neighbors would be home any minute. Shortly afterwards, I saw the hawk sitting in the tree but Peanut was nowhere in sight and that's when I really began to panic. I went next door with intentions to confess until I saw Peanut sitting on the porch. To this day I am the only one who knows that Peanut was almost eaten alive.

Javaris A., thank you for letting us share your essay with future UGA applicants.

Go Dawgs!

Monday, May 22, 2017

2018 Freshman Application Changes



With each new year of admissions comes changes to the application and/or application process so that we can make better decisions every year, and also make sure that we are able to release decisions in time frame that works for both our office and the applicants. As such, here are the changes for the freshman application for students starting in Summer/Fall of 2018.


  1. Coalition Application - Starting this year, we will begin accepting applications submitted through the Coalition for Access, Affordability and Success (also known as the Coalition Application). We will continue to have our own application (and we expect a majority of our applicants will use our form), but we wanted to allow students who use the Coalition Application for multiple colleges to have this option. We will still be accepting documents through our normal methods of Naviance/Parchment, GaFutures and documents sent by mail, so there is no change that needs to happen for counseling offices sending us materials. 
  2. Short Answer/Essay Changes - Students who apply Early Action (EA) or Regular Decision (RD) will complete the exact same application, as there will now be two short answer/essay questions for both EA and RD applicants. In the past, EA applicants did not complete the short answer/essays unless they were deferred, but now all freshman applicants will complete these when they apply. As well, we have shifted from three to two short answer/essays for applicants. This change will allow us to begin our holistic read process earlier, will eliminate the issue of hounding EA deferred students to submit the essays at a later date, and will help us maintain our decision release timelines.
  3. Regular Decision Deadline - We will be shifting the Regular Decision application deadline to January 1 (up from prior years of January 15), with a document deadline of January 8. The Early Action deadline will remain October 15 (with the document deadline on October 22). As our application pool has increased, we have been challenged to keep pace with a mid-late March final decision timeline, and this change will help keep us on track.
  4. SAT/ACT Test Dates - For Regular Decision or Deferred Early Action applicants, the last test dates we will be able to use will be the December dates. Both the SAT and ACT have changed their test date offerings, and as such this has caused us to change our timelines. As well (just like past years), make sure you request the scores to be sent to UGA by the application deadline (for both EA and RD timelines). 
We expect the new essay questions to come out shortly, and I will post them here when they are available. I hope this information helps you plan out your application time lines for next year!

Go Dawgs!

Friday, May 12, 2017

2017 Wait List Update

UPDATE: We now expect to release final WL decisions on either Monday, 5/22 or Tuesday, 5/23. We were hoping to release them earlier, but issues came up that delayed these decisions.

Starting today and going through the early part of next week, we will be finalizing decisions for all students on the Wait List. Due to the fact that our deposit numbers are slightly above the level that we predicted for next year, we are very limited in the number of offers we are able to make. We will be making all Wait List decisions in the same manner as our other admission decisions, where a decision will be displayed on the status page and an email will be sent shortly after a decision is made to alert the applicant that a status change has occurred. Admitted students will have a  two-week Commitment Deposit deadline from the acceptance date. We will not be calling students about the Wait List, but instead will be using the status page for the decision release.

In reviewing the students who we admitted off the Wait List, there were a variety of individual reasons for the offers that were made. As such, I cannot give an overarching reason for the decisions. We did take into account our earlier reviews of the files, along with a wide range of information that we had on hand.

For those many strong students we were not able to admit from the Wait List, we thank you for choosing us as one of the options for your higher education.  We wish you the very best of college success.  We understand that this is not the news you were hoping for, and we very much appreciate your patience “waiting on the Wait List.”  Please remember that there are a number of complex reasons why the University made the final decisions it did, and we respectfully remind all that this blog cannot be used for comments about why you or other individuals did or did not get admitted in the Wait list process.

We hope that our quick turn around of the Wait List situation has allowed you and your family to make plans on a much earlier time frame that initially projected.

Monday, May 8, 2017

Letting Them Drive Alone

I can still remember one of the most terrifying moments in life as a parent, the day my son turned 16 and received his official driver's license. We could handle the learner's permit, as we could sit in the passenger's seat and at least feel like we had some control of the situation. But when he arrived home after getting the official license and asked to go out without us, terror hit us hard. Even with his younger sister as a co-pilot, my wife and I were still terrified of what might happen.

But being good parents, we held back our tears and our fears and allowed them to head off on the longest 8 mile drive of our lives. My wife and I hovered over our iPhones, tracking every turn and stop, wondering why the map was taking so long to refresh their location. And you know what? They arrived safely. Amazingly, they even made it back home alive. And as the days and weeks went by, we started tracking him less and less, and instead we started celebrating the end to our child-chauffeur days.

Occasionally, there would be the small bump in the road, from the dead battery to a minor fender bender, but everything turned out just fine. Our fears of major accidents, our kids getting lost without us there to help them, and the unknown of who else is on the roads with them started to vanish. I even survived my daughter's spontaneous road trip through Atlanta highway traffic to go to a Sunflower Festival in Calhoun, GA without dying on the spot (I confess I did check her progress on the iPhone about 10 times though).

How does this relate to College Admissions? Well, in early August, about 3 months from now, the parents of the Class of 2021 will have to let their children drive their college forward alone. You will still be there checking up on them, texting them, and sending them care packages, but you will no longer be riding in the passenger seat. Those first few days will be filled with doubt, wondering if they are eating right, making good choices and meeting new friends. There will be a few bumps in the road, from that first rough test, a disagreement with their roommate or that initial feeling of being lost. But amazingly, they survive. Actually, they do more than survive, they thrive. They become a part of this amazing community known as UGA, and you smile.

For some of you, this will be your first child going on to college. For others, this is the final one (I am there with you empty-nesters!), and this will be a little easier. No matter what though, it is still tough to let them go it alone. But just like your children, you will survive, and you will thrive.

Go Dawgs!

Monday, April 10, 2017

2017 UGA Merit Based Scholarships have been Awarded

Over the last several months the Admissions staff has carefully reviewed all our newly admitted First Year students to consider them for University of Georgia academic merit scholarships.  (See the list and our discussion of merit and need-based aid at our website, https://admissions.uga.edu/article/scholarships-at-uga.html.)  All scholarships available through Admissions have now been awarded, and we have contacted each of the recipients via email and mail.

At UGA, academic merit scholarships have become increasingly competitive.  This is mainly due to the limited funding we have for these awards and the high number of extremely capable students who now gain University of Georgia admission. 

Always continue to search for scholarship opportunities, whether or not you have been awarded a scholarship from Undergraduate Admissions Office.  Search your academic major for scholarships online.  Use our web site and the Office of Student Financial Aid web site to search for external scholarship opportunities. Also, remember to look for local scholarship opportunities for students in your home community.





If you have been selected for any of our Academic Merit awards, congratulations!  Please be sure to read your offer letter carefully.  Keep it for your records.  In this letter you will see what requirements you must maintain to renew your scholarship each succeeding year and, in general, how much the scholarship is worth in relation to your overall costs. 

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Admissions and Forrest Gump's Box of Chocolates

As Forrest Gump says, "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you will get." Undergraduate Admissions, especially during decision time, has some real connections to this this quote. Our post-decision interactions (mostly with denied students and families) many times involves an attempt to compare their own student with other admitted students that they know. Many students think they know other applicants in detail due to the fact that they sit next to each other in Biology, they know their rank in class and they might know the ACT Composite if the student posted it on Snapchat.

But in the admissions world, life is really more like the infamous box of chocolates. When you look at all the chocolates in the box, you see the outer chocolate layer, and many times you think you know what is inside due to the shape of the candy. But in reality, you really only know the surface, and don't know if it is caramel, nougat, or coconut until you get to the center. In the same way, students know the surface information of other students, but they generally do not know the inner details of another person's life.

They might know a GPA or rank, but they do not know their UGA recalculated GPA, the academic trends we see, and the letter of recommendation that we receive from their AP Calc teacher. They might know some of their school activities, but they might not know about the volunteer work they did at the local food bank over the summer. They may know about the ACT composite, but they might not know about the stronger SAT R, or the individual ACT English and Math subscores that UGA focuses on. They might know where they live, but they might not know about the personal challenges the student and/or family has overcome due to medical/financial/personal issues. You might know that they are strong in AP English, but you might not know that this has led to some amazing essays that show true voice and excellent writing skills.

As such, you never know what you will get with an admissions application until to get to the heart of the file, and learn in great deal what each student is truly like. So please, don't judge other applicants by the outer shell that you know, and understand that there is more to them than just what you see from the outside.

As Forrest Gump said, "My Mama always said you've got to put the past behind you before you can move on." Decision time is tough, and you might not always get the answer you want, but the key is to move forward from this decision and focus on your future college experiences. Select a college that fits you best, and then do great there!



Friday, March 17, 2017

2017 Freshman Admits

We plan to make the final wave of freshman decisions available late afternoon on March 17th.

For those of you who have been admitted to UGA, here is a post for you and a chance to comment.  Please remember that this is not a blog where you should post statistics or throw fellow students under the bus. These types of comments will be deleted.

Congratulations to all of the freshman who were admitted and we look forward to you becoming part of the Bulldog Nation.  The next steps for a new student can be seen in the flyer in your admission packet, so please go ahead and review what you need to do next.  In addition, there will be a great deal of information you can access off of your Status page.  When you have the time, please review this, as there is key information in the Next Step materials.  Please remember a small number of students will be admitted to start in January 2018.  You will find specific information on your Status page and in your admissions packet.

Here are some rough statistics on the Entire Freshman Admitted Class for 2017-EA, February and March waves, where we admitted approximately 12,900 students total (I do not have separate data on just the final group, sorry):

UGA Calculated Grade Point Average mid-range/average:  3.94 - 4.20, with a 4.05 average

  • Please remember this is not the GPA students see on their high school transcript, but rather the GPA that UGA recalculates for everyone based on the core academic courses taken in high school and looking at the actual grades posted on the transcripts. 


SATR Best Score Total (EBRW and Math) average: 1381
  • Because of the shift from SAT 1 to SATR this year, I am giving out the SATR information with SAT 1/ACT information converted to the SATR scoring structure (or Best Score). This is not exact due to the SAT change, but it is the best we can do right now.

ACT Composite average:  30


 AP/IB/Dual Enrollment course mid-range/average: 6-10 courses, average of 8
  • We determine academic rigor based on all core classes a student has taken (CP, Honors, Advanced, AP, IB, DE, etc.), but this information is the most specific data I can give on it.

Remember that the Housing and myID pages may need a few business days before your information will be available.  Please be patient with these sites.

You have until May 1 to submit a commitment deposit in order to hold a spot in our freshman class.  We hope the next stage of the admission process is a little less nerve wracking than the decision process.  As you celebrate, make sure to be considerate of others in your school who may not have been admitted.

Good luck in the next stage of the college admissions process.  Go Dawgs!

2017 Wait List Decisions

We plan to make the final wave of freshman decisions available late afternoon on March 17th.   For some students, you will be offered a place on our wait list.  Every year our office has to predict approximately how many students we can admit in order to enroll our freshman class, but we can never be sure how many students will enroll until after the May 1 commitment deposit deadline has passed.  If the number of students who say they will be attending UGA is lower than we expect, we may need to go to our wait list group in order to get the size that we want for our freshman class.  This year we have just under 900 students on the wait list.  We carefully monitor the deposits coming into the University to see where we are in comparison to the predicted freshman numbers.

For those of you who have been wait-listed, here is a chance for you to comment.  Please remember that this is not a blog where you should post statistics or throw fellow classmates under the bus.  These types of comments will be deleted. Before commenting/asking questions here, please review the decision letter and the FAQ, as they give a great deal of details of the Wait List process.

The Wait List FAQ can answer some questions, but the most important thing you need to do is decide if you want to remain on the wait list.  Follow the instructions on the status check or wait list letter we mailed to let us know if you want to stay on the wait list or if you want to decline this option and move forward with admission at another college.  If you decide to stay on the wait list, you should still move forward with an alternate college plan as we will not know about any wait list options until May at the earliest.  If you select to stay on the wait list, we will know that you still want to attend UGA if an opportunity opens up.  The key word in wait list is wait as this is not a quick process.  So please be prepared to wait.

There are three options for the wait list reply.  You can say no, please do not consider me for the wait list.  The next option is to remain on the wait list, but only if it is for the Fall term.  The third option is to remain on the wait list and be considered for both Fall and Spring terms.  This is so that if there is space available for the Fall term, we will look at all of the students who have asked to remain on the wait list.  If the only space available is for Spring term, we will only look at students who said Fall or Spring.  Once you select an option, you cannot change it so be sure to think about your decision before you make your selection.

We will not know details about the wait list until after May 15, and it may be well well into June before we make wait list decisions.  Please be patient with our office and read the FAQ before asking questions as it can give you a great deal of information. If you do not feel like you can wait until mid-May through mid-June for a decision, it may be that the wait list option is not for you.

2017 Freshman Denials

We plan to make the final wave of freshman decisions available late afternoon on March 17th.   Unfortunately, we were not able to admit a number of strong applicants as we are limited in the size of our freshman class.  We know that you have a number of other strong college options and suggest you focus on the other great opportunities that are ahead rather than on a denial from UGA.  If your ultimate goal is to graduate from the University of Georgia, then we suggest you look at transfer opportunities down the road.  For now, focus on your current college options, find one that fits you best, and have a great freshman year there.  Please read our Denied Student FAQ if you have questions. If you decide to contact us next week, please understand that we will not be able to give you a specific "reason" for a denial, as in this process we have looked at everything within everyone's file, and the overall reason is really that the overall applicant pool is very large and very strong.

Please remember that this is not a blog where you should post statistics or throw fellow classmates under the bus.  These types of comments will be deleted.

Monday, March 13, 2017

2017 Freshman Final Decisions

Yes, the question that all freshmen applicants (and their parents) have been asking again and again can finally be answered. Final decisions for freshman applicants are scheduled to be released on Friday, March 17 (unless something catastrophic occurs). Decisions will be available on the status page sometime in the late afternoon on Friday (no do not ask for an exact time, I do not have it) and applicants will be able to view their decisions. As well, emails to all freshman waiting for a decision will go out shortly after we make decisions, indicating a change in their status.

There will be three decision groups (Admit, Deny and Wait-List), and I will try to post some information on all three of these decisions this week. We will also have a small group of freshman that we will admit for the Spring 2018 term. I do not have any statistics on the groups at this time, but we will have more data on the overall admit group by the end of the week.

Please do not have multiple people in your family try to log into the status page on Friday, as this will slow everything down. Just have one person (hopefully yourself) log into status, be patient, and tell family members who want to see your status page to wait until later.

Remember, we cannot and will not give out any decisions by phone, in person or by email, and we are as happy as you are to have decision day finally get here.

Transfers: We will continue to review transfer files and make decisions available on Fridays on the status page. Transfer decision letters will continue to be sent out and an email will go out shortly after the Friday decision release if an applicant's status has changed.

Go Dawgs!

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Summer/Fall 2017 Transfer Reviews

In mid-February, our office started reviewing Summer transfer applications, as well as a small number of fall transfer decisions.  The deadline for summer has not passed and we are still receiving applications and documents, so we cannot say how long it will take us to finish or guess when you will hear a decision.  If you applied early for summer or fall, please be sure to check your Status page to see if we have your most up-to-date transcript(s).  If you were enrolled in coursework last fall and have not sent a transcript with your fall grades, you should have one sent as soon as possible.  To be complete and ready to review, we must have a transcript from each college/university you have previously attended.  If we see that you were enrolled in courses last fall and we do not have a transcript with those grades, you are not complete and this will delay a review of your application.

Once we complete the Summer transfer reviews, we will then begin to focus full time on our review Fall transfer applicants. Just like the summer files, we do not know how many will apply, how long each review will take, when you will hear, etc. The best this is to just be patient as we review the files. As well, Fall transfer applicants need to make sure we have the most up-to-date transcripts, and that we have individual transcripts from each college attended, even if it was dual enrollment work in high school.

One change for this year's transfer decisions is that we have a new admissions system, which allows for a little quicker review of files, but more importantly for communications to go out once a change to your application status (generally an admit or deny decision) has been made. We will be releasing transfer decisions every Friday late afternoon (starting this Friday, 2/24), and emails go out about 15 minutes after a decision is released. This means there is no need to constantly check on your status page for a change, and it allows us to perform a number of checks on decisions prior to releasing them. 

Go Dawgs!

Friday, February 17, 2017

2017 February Freshman Admit Group

The February freshman admission offers will be available late afternoon on Friday, February 17..

UGA will offer admission to a group of roughly 1,600 freshman applicants. This group of decisions is made up of only offers of admission, and if you were admitted, you will be able to see the decision on your Status page (so only admitted students will see a decision change on their Status page) and these admits will receive an email communication. Additionally, an admissions packet will be sent out in the mail early next week. Our office is too busy reviewing files for me to run any mid-range academic averages at this time, but the academic information should be very similar to the Early Action admitted students (it will not be exactly the same, as we had a large number of EA admits who were applying for our top scholarships, which slightly skews EA stats a little higher). The press release about our Early Action decisions gives more details on the academic averages for this group. As we did in the November Early Action offers of admission, there will be some scholarship offers in this group, and those who have received them will see it on the status page. We will continue to offer scholarships through early April, so please be patient as we do these reviews.

These admitted freshman, made up of mostly Regular Decision applicants, met the stringent academic criteria of Early Action admission that we used with our much larger wave of November admission offers. Do not panic if you were not admitted with this February group. We are still very much in the midst of carefully reviewing documents and data on a great many more files, and there are still lots of decisions to make.  Again, admitted students will see their decision on their Status page, while applicants who do not yet have a decision will see the same Status message as before. The final wave of freshman application decisions will be made by mid-late March after we have completed our holistic file reading process. Thank you for your patience as we finish our reviews over the next month.

Lastly, please make sure to review the Urban Legends page and all my posts about ignoring myths that you might hear about admissions, as these myths are incorrect (major has no impact on a decision, we do not limit the number of admission offers by school, zip code, etc.). As well, please remember that I cannot discuss any other students on this blog, I cannot guess about decisions, and I ask that any comments should not be harmful to other applicants.

Go Dawgs!!

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

The Importance of Depth

For the last fifteen years or so, my family has made an intentional decision to try and have birthday events and gifts be focused on an activity. We have planned scavenger hunts, rafter down several Tennessee rivers, hit the ski slopes in West Virginia, and gone cave spelunking in Kentucky. I vividly remember a trip early on where we went tubing down the Chattahoochee in Helen, GA. For those who don't know what tubing is, it is the outdoor version of a lazy river, and Helen is a wonderful location for this adventure. You park at the tubing center, catch a quick bus ride (with your inner tube and life vest) up river, then have a relaxing float downstream.

Unfortunately, during this middle of the summer tubing adventure, a problem arose: a drought that year meant the water level in the river was precariously low. In reality, nothing revolving around tubing is precarious. The worst that can possibly happen is generally a mild sunburn or floating a little too far away from your family. But a low level of water means less effortless floating and more standing, walking, pushing, and annoyance. It also means more complaining by family members, which becomes a downward spiral. Water depth (along with bug spray and sunscreen) is key to a good tubing adventure. Good water depth provides a smooth, consistent trip down the river.

In the same vein, depth is key in reading admissions files. When we are reading applications, we are looking at a number of factors, and one item we look for is depth. I love to see a student find a handful of co-curricular activities and, over the course of three to four years, develop both skills and leadership roles in these areas. Too many times we see files where a student suddenly adds 12th grade only clubs, sports, volunteer work and academic rigor in an attempt to boost their resume. To put it bluntly, applications that "are a mile wide and an inch deep" are not viewed as strongly as ones which show consistency. In the same way, we look for depth in a student's curriculum. When we are looking at a student's academic rigor, we are looking at what is available and what is then taken, and we focus on all four years of core courses, not just on the number of AP classes taken (a myth that I always have to correct).

In saying this, we still enjoy seeing students who try some activity that is outside their comfort zone. I have seen "jocks" try out for the senior play, a group of students start a diving team from scratch, or a person finding a need in their community that they try to help. We love seeing people step up and stretch out. But overall, we value depth in the application, from curriculum to grades to activities.

I hope this helps in understanding a little more about our review process. Go Dawgs!


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Summer/Fall 2017 Transfer/Transient Applications are Open

The Summer/Fall transfer and transient applications opened on Tuesday, January 24. While the application is now open, please take your time completing it. Again, please take your time, as it is much easier to submit a correct application than fix problems with a error filled one. Make sure you are applying for the correct program, the correct campus, the correct term, etc. Here are a few suggestions and updates for transfer applicants. 

While the application is open, we project we will not begin reviewing Summer transfers and transients until mid-late February, and we will not start with Fall transfers until March.
  • Review our transfer procedures and requirements, as well as our academic consideration levels.
  • Select the term you wish to attend, not one you have heard is easier to get in (this is a myth). If you select summer, for instance, we expect you to attend for summer, and if you do not, you cannot then attend in the fall.
  • Please send in all the required transcripts after you apply, not before. As well, we need all transcripts from colleges ever attended, even if you attended a college during HS.
  • When you are at the page where you enter in your previous schools, start typing in the name or city of the school, and it will auto generate schools that match. Select the correct one and the right code will then populate.
  • If a transcript has a different name than the one you applied with, please make sure to let us know so we can match up documents,
  • If you started a freshman application earlier to set up an account, you will need to change the application type, etc.
  • It is much better to get everything correct before applying rather than try to fix things after you submit an application, so triple check everything.
  • Once you apply, be patient. Review the timelines page on this blog, give us time to match up things, and relax. For document matching purposes, we suggest you give us 10 business days from when you apply or submit transcripts, whichever one comes last.
  • Make sure to monitor your status page after sending in transcripts, but give us time to complete your file.
Go Dawgs, and be patient!